Alf Ramsey

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Another story from the archives of the 1970s series "Book of Football"

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100% serious..

You can learn something new every day :dawson: :brad: :freundgoal: :levystare:

That's true I guess..... Only today it dawned on me that Spurs are probably NEVER gonna finish above ArseAnal in my lifetime!!

#ArseAnalcorrupttothecore!
 
Alf Ramsey was the first Tottenham player to score in the 'old' Wembley. It's quite depressing that Jenas is the first Spurs player to score in the 'new' Wembley.
 
great stuff, thanks, I love these trips down memory lane

have you (or anyone else for that matter) got anything on Arthur Rowe? would love to read more about him, especially about his time in Hungary. seemed to be a very important but rarely mentioned (except by Spurs fans) figure in the history of the game. he developed the push and run style of play at Spurs, which he further developed in Hungary, who then took it to greater heights and sowed the seeds of the total football of Ajax, Holland, Barcelona et al
 
great stuff, thanks, I love these trips down memory lane

have you (or anyone else for that matter) got anything on Arthur Rowe? would love to read more about him, especially about his time in Hungary. seemed to be a very important but rarely mentioned (except by Spurs fans) figure in the history of the game. he developed the push and run style of play at Spurs, which he further developed in Hungary, who then took it to greater heights and sowed the seeds of the total football of Ajax, Holland, Barcelona et al

No, not an article about him, but that era is touched upon in this thread:
http://www.thefightingcock.co.uk/forum/threads/tottenham-hotspur-up-to-1971-1972.5725/
 

Guido 🇺🇦

"Legacy Fan"
Seeing as it's the 50th anniversary of England's World Cup Win.......and to be honest I couldn't give two fucks about it, completely and utterly bored of hearing about it.........I thought I'd bump this thread to focus on the man rather than the team. Were it not for his time spent at Tottenham and in particular under the tutelage of one of the games greatest ever managers, Arthur Rowe, it is doubtful he would have gone on to Manage England and therefore win the World Cup.

No big research from me as I have just lifted this from wikipedia but it serves as a timely reminder about "The Tottenham Way", a brand of football that has always focused on passing the ball and can be traced back to Peter McWilliam and some say as far back as John Cameron, one thing is for sure, the way we play the game has always be revolutionary, has always been beautiful to watch and envied and copied by teams from around the world.
Alf Ramsey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Tottenham Hotspur[edit]

Push-and-run; champions of England[edit]
A good relationship quickly developed between Ramsey and his new manager, finding that they shared similar personalities and views on tactics. Like Ramsey, Rowe believed in a progressive, fast-moving style of play. These ideas evolved into "push-and-run", a playing style unlike anything previously attempted in British football, based around quick passing. Tottenham pioneered the style to good effect—a Spurs player moving forward would lay the ball off to a team-mate, then run past the opposing defender to receive an immediate return pass. "Under Rowe, Alf became far more than a defender," comments McKinstry. Rowe tasked him with instigating attacks and based much of the Tottenham game plan around Ramsey's accurate passing.

George Robb, who joined Tottenham in 1951
"Tottenham became a great side through push-and-run, which was tailor-made for Alf. There was no long ball from him, and he was one of the crucial members of the side ... Alf played a tremendous part in setting the pass pattern, which wasn't typical of the British game. It was a revolutionary side, very well-knit".

Tottenham started the [URL='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1949%E2%80%9350_Football_League']1949–50 season strongly and soon topped the Second Division: between August 1949 and January 1950 they did not lose in 22 matches. "Ramsey was an essential part of the team, having made the right-back position his own; he built effective partnerships with several players, including the wing-half Bill Nicholson, the goalkeeper Ted Ditchburn and the inside-right Sonny Walters. Ramsey greatly appreciated the licence Rowe gave him to move forward and attack and, in November 1949, in an away match against Grimsby Town, he scored what is generally considered the best goal of his career. Shortly after half-time, he intercepted a long pass near the half-way line and, after running 40 yards and dribbling past three Grimsby defenders, smashed the ball past the advancing goalkeeper. The reporter for The Enfield Gazette wrote that the goal would "never be forgotten by those privileged to be present". Tottenham went on to win the match 3–2.[/URL]

Spurs won the 1949–50 Second Division title with seven games to spare, scoring more goals and conceding fewer than any of their rivals, and were promoted to the First Division for the following season. In August 1950, shortly before Tottenham embarked on their first top-flight season since they had been relegated at the end of the 1934–35 campaign, Rowe told the club's annual meeting: "As much as anything else, I would rate our good time last year to the acquisition of Alf Ramsey." After an uncertain start to the 1950–51 season, Spurs quickly recovered their form of the previous year and by Christmas were top of the table. Ramsey continued to play a key role, according to McKinstry playing "the best football of his life": "He was the master of strategy, the lynchpin of a side that built its attacks from the back, the scheming practitioner who put Rowe's plans into action."[55] His understanding of the game and authority on and off the field led to his team-mates nicknaming him "The General". On 28 April 1951, with a 1–0 home victory over Sheffield Wednesday, Tottenham were crowned champions of England only a year after promotion. "I think fortune shone upon me very handsomely during the 1950–51 season," Ramsey remarked in Talking Football—"After all, I was a member of one of the finest club teams in years".

Tottenham Hotspur
Position: Right Back
1949-1955 Played: 226
Scored: 24

Honours
Division 2 Champions 1949-50
Division 1 Champions 1950-51
 
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