Levy / ENIC

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Latest Spurs videos from Sky Sports

More people watch Mark Goldbridge than the outdated and archaic BBC, broadcasting bullshit communism
Wrong as usual.

BBC Gardeners World - 2.5m viewers every Friday plus 100,000s more on iPlayer.

Goldbridge averages around 100k per youtube video.

Edit...
Btw - In 2020/21, the BBC achieved record figures with an average audience of 489 million adults every week.
 
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Which oil state wants in?
More likely to be one of the losing bidders from the chavs sale.

Excited Tim And Eric Awesome Show Great Job GIF
 
This will have been seen by a lot of people , programme goes out worldwide, it was a part of last Friday's Gardeners World on the BBC .
There was also a feature done by Spurs TV last year with Dier showing his green fingers.


This is an excellent insight.

The club really do a lot of great work behind the scenes.
 

Shadydan

ENIC hokey cokey
The John Thomas school of how to support THFC.

1) Slag Levy of for sacking previous manager.

2) If we get linked with a "lesser" manager, slag Levy off for being tight and say "it's the cheap option"

3) If we get linked with a top manager, slag Levy off and say he'll only get him because he's "the cheap option"

4) If we appoint a"lesser" manager, slag Levy off for being tight and slag our manager off before a ball is kicked.

5) Continue to slag our manager off all through pre season and slag off any new signings we make.

6) Season starts badly , continually slag Levy off for not sacking manager, saying he's too tight to sack him and that he doesn't care about the fans and won't listen to them.

7) Manager gets sacked, slag Levy off for sacking manager and say that it was fan pressure that made it happen.

8) Slag Levy off for not having a manager the very same day.

9) Slag Levy off for appointing a top manager, saying it's the cheap option.

10) Slag Levy off and continually say that Conte will walk because of Levy.

11) Slag Levy off for buying rejects, keep saying that Conte will walk.

12) When we're in 4th do not post for weeks.

13) When we drop to 5th post 22 times in a couple of days slagging off Levy.

14) When we get 4th say "we should all celebrate together"

Proper fan

:dembelelol: :dembelelol: :dembelelol:

Still relevant 👍
 
The fans having a formal say in decision making is weird because how far does it extend? They have an input on transfers? Ticket prices? Levy could in theory give them a voice and just ignore everything they say. The flip side is we do have a formal voice in that we can not turn up to games, not buy club merchandise, give our opinion on social media etc.
 

he focus is inevitably on achieving good results at Tottenham Hotspur, but not simply on the field. As part of the regeneration of the area around their new stadium, Spurs built (and now run) a school that has done so well that ten pupils at present have Oxbridge offers and await next week’s A-level results day hopefully.

Spurs fans thronging into their gleaming home may not realise that there is a school attached, as well as an art gallery that recently exhibited portraits of heartbroken England men’s players at the European Championship. They may not notice the artificial pitch made of 18,000 recycled trainers and small-sided pitches where club coaches work on talent ID at nearby schools. They may not know about the club’s employment policy that has given hope, purpose and funds to local youngsters with cerebral palsy.


Premier League clubs get things wrong at times, they can overcharge fans for kits and tickets, but they remain vital hubs of the community. The Tottenham Hotspur Stadium is more than an arena that wins architectural awards and houses a confident Champions League team. It’s a beacon of hope and belief in an area that is among the most deprived wards in the country.
It’s only a decade since the streets here were set ablaze during riots, and visiting fans subsequently chanted: “You stupid bastards, you burnt your own town.” Some local youths were more likely to join gangs than coaching sessions. Now, outside of match days, they flock to the stadium to be coached and educated.
One of the pupils at the London Academy of Excellence Tottenham (LAET) is Rachel Oloyede-Oyeyemi, who has an offer to read English literature at Cambridge. “I live near where Mark Duggan got shot,” she says of the killing of a 29-year-old black man by police on August 4, 2011, that triggered the riots. “Everyone was on edge there. It was scary. I didn’t want to go outside. It was like Tottenham’s burning down.”

Now it is rebuilding. “I don’t think I’d be doing English lit or thinking about Cambridge without this school,” she adds. “The teaching gave me the fire I needed. They cultivated my love for English. They really show you how much you can achieve if you genuinely put your mind to it.”

LAET is a state-funded sixth form assisted by Spurs and Highgate School, who also help with interview technique to prepare pupils for Oxbridge. “It feels that Tottenham’s proud again, people coming to this beautiful stadium for football but also education,” she says. “The stadium’s a symbol of hope.”

Another pupil, Giovanni Rose, was eight during the riots. “On my road, Park Lane [adjacent to the old and new stadium], there was a gang and it was a very violent time,” Rose says, also recalling what befell the famous Carpetright store on Tottenham High Road. “One of my friends had his house set on fire, it was crazy. I’m grateful to the club, 100 per cent, as it’s kept a lot of us safe.”

Since coming under the guidance of Spurs, Rose has had some of his poetry published by the BBC, studied maths, further maths and physics at LAET and received an offer from King’s College London. “I wouldn’t even be doing A-levels without this place,” he says, looking around LAET.

The Times is given a tour, including to where two games are taking place in the N17 arena behind the South Stand. The Tottenham Foundation has worked hard with local children coming out of lockdown, using the new pitches for games and rebuilding relationships. “They’ve missed out on social interaction,” one staff member confides. “They’re always happy to come down here to sessions. It’s about safe spaces.”

Yards away, on a smaller-sided pitch, two academy coaches, Danny Mitchell and Nick Hardy, are working with under-tens, looking for potential talent for Spurs. “The badge is very important,” Mitchell says. “We want to tap into their passion for the team.” They also find that players open up to coaches over issues in their lives. It’s about developing the player and the individual. “It’s a holistic piece,” Mitchell adds.

Throughout August, Spurs deliver a programme of free holiday activity, from football to the performing arts, for young people at the N17 arena. The aim is to promote “health and wellbeing and reduce levels of crime and antisocial behaviour” but there is also more talent ID work.

Continuing around the ground, along Tottenham High Road we find the grade II listed Warmington House incorporated in the structure of the stadium. Restored to its original 1828 glory and removed from Historic England’s at-risk register, the building houses OOF, an art gallery. “OOF is the sound of someone getting tackled very hard,” explains Eddy Frankel, the inspiration behind the gallery and a Spurs fan.

Frankel was seeking exhibition space in the area and contacted the club. “Spurs went, ‘Well, we’ve got this listed building.’ ” Frankel’s first exhibition had works from the Young British Artists school, including a Sarah Lucas and a Marcus Harvey lent by Damien Hirst. As Harvey’s works are also on display at MoMA in New York, OOF has done well. “To have them here was amazing,” Frankel says. Eric Dier was one of the first to visit.

More recently Frankel curated an exhibition, En-Ger-Land. This included Beatrice Lettice Boyle’s portraits of a haunted Bukayo Saka, Jack Grealish and Jadon Sancho, entitled Tears in Their Eyes, after their loss to Italy in last year’s Euros final. “It’s about the repercussions [of defeat],” Frankel says.

During En-Ger-Land, visitors were encouraged to draw versions of England trauma. “I had to edit them every morning to remove all the penises and take away anything offensive to our rivals!” Frankel says.

More than 20,000 people a year visit OOF. “Over 95 per cent of people coming here have never been to a contemporary art exhibition,” Frankel says. “There are four schools around the stadium, so what is the chance of them getting taken to the Tate or National Gallery? Never.”

The present exhibition is by the French artist Leyman Lahcine, of footballers as “angst-ridden string puppets”. As the captions explain: “Instead of taking the ball down on your chest and accelerating towards goal, your body collapses into a tangle of soft, lifeless limbs. The groan from the crowd is deafening . . . This is how it always ends.”

Fortunately not for Spurs at the moment. They’re flying. Back in the stadium I find the chicken house, and talk to one of the staff, Aaron Plummer, who has cerebral palsy. “When I went for jobs before, they saw my learning disability before they saw me,” Plummer says. “I was looking for a job for over a year. I didn’t know where to go. Then Tottenham gave me a chance.

“I clean tables, making it spotless. It’s changed my life: to say I work at somewhere like Tottenham with 50,000 fans!” The regeneration game continues apace at Spurs.
 

he focus is inevitably on achieving good results at Tottenham Hotspur, but not simply on the field. As part of the regeneration of the area around their new stadium, Spurs built (and now run) a school that has done so well that ten pupils at present have Oxbridge offers and await next week’s A-level results day hopefully.

Spurs fans thronging into their gleaming home may not realise that there is a school attached, as well as an art gallery that recently exhibited portraits of heartbroken England men’s players at the European Championship. They may not notice the artificial pitch made of 18,000 recycled trainers and small-sided pitches where club coaches work on talent ID at nearby schools. They may not know about the club’s employment policy that has given hope, purpose and funds to local youngsters with cerebral palsy.


Premier League clubs get things wrong at times, they can overcharge fans for kits and tickets, but they remain vital hubs of the community. The Tottenham Hotspur Stadium is more than an arena that wins architectural awards and houses a confident Champions League team. It’s a beacon of hope and belief in an area that is among the most deprived wards in the country.
It’s only a decade since the streets here were set ablaze during riots, and visiting fans subsequently chanted: “You stupid bastards, you burnt your own town.” Some local youths were more likely to join gangs than coaching sessions. Now, outside of match days, they flock to the stadium to be coached and educated.
One of the pupils at the London Academy of Excellence Tottenham (LAET) is Rachel Oloyede-Oyeyemi, who has an offer to read English literature at Cambridge. “I live near where Mark Duggan got shot,” she says of the killing of a 29-year-old black man by police on August 4, 2011, that triggered the riots. “Everyone was on edge there. It was scary. I didn’t want to go outside. It was like Tottenham’s burning down.”

Now it is rebuilding. “I don’t think I’d be doing English lit or thinking about Cambridge without this school,” she adds. “The teaching gave me the fire I needed. They cultivated my love for English. They really show you how much you can achieve if you genuinely put your mind to it.”

LAET is a state-funded sixth form assisted by Spurs and Highgate School, who also help with interview technique to prepare pupils for Oxbridge. “It feels that Tottenham’s proud again, people coming to this beautiful stadium for football but also education,” she says. “The stadium’s a symbol of hope.”

Another pupil, Giovanni Rose, was eight during the riots. “On my road, Park Lane [adjacent to the old and new stadium], there was a gang and it was a very violent time,” Rose says, also recalling what befell the famous Carpetright store on Tottenham High Road. “One of my friends had his house set on fire, it was crazy. I’m grateful to the club, 100 per cent, as it’s kept a lot of us safe.”

Since coming under the guidance of Spurs, Rose has had some of his poetry published by the BBC, studied maths, further maths and physics at LAET and received an offer from King’s College London. “I wouldn’t even be doing A-levels without this place,” he says, looking around LAET.

The Times is given a tour, including to where two games are taking place in the N17 arena behind the South Stand. The Tottenham Foundation has worked hard with local children coming out of lockdown, using the new pitches for games and rebuilding relationships. “They’ve missed out on social interaction,” one staff member confides. “They’re always happy to come down here to sessions. It’s about safe spaces.”

Yards away, on a smaller-sided pitch, two academy coaches, Danny Mitchell and Nick Hardy, are working with under-tens, looking for potential talent for Spurs. “The badge is very important,” Mitchell says. “We want to tap into their passion for the team.” They also find that players open up to coaches over issues in their lives. It’s about developing the player and the individual. “It’s a holistic piece,” Mitchell adds.

Throughout August, Spurs deliver a programme of free holiday activity, from football to the performing arts, for young people at the N17 arena. The aim is to promote “health and wellbeing and reduce levels of crime and antisocial behaviour” but there is also more talent ID work.

Continuing around the ground, along Tottenham High Road we find the grade II listed Warmington House incorporated in the structure of the stadium. Restored to its original 1828 glory and removed from Historic England’s at-risk register, the building houses OOF, an art gallery. “OOF is the sound of someone getting tackled very hard,” explains Eddy Frankel, the inspiration behind the gallery and a Spurs fan.

Frankel was seeking exhibition space in the area and contacted the club. “Spurs went, ‘Well, we’ve got this listed building.’ ” Frankel’s first exhibition had works from the Young British Artists school, including a Sarah Lucas and a Marcus Harvey lent by Damien Hirst. As Harvey’s works are also on display at MoMA in New York, OOF has done well. “To have them here was amazing,” Frankel says. Eric Dier was one of the first to visit.

More recently Frankel curated an exhibition, En-Ger-Land. This included Beatrice Lettice Boyle’s portraits of a haunted Bukayo Saka, Jack Grealish and Jadon Sancho, entitled Tears in Their Eyes, after their loss to Italy in last year’s Euros final. “It’s about the repercussions [of defeat],” Frankel says.

During En-Ger-Land, visitors were encouraged to draw versions of England trauma. “I had to edit them every morning to remove all the penises and take away anything offensive to our rivals!” Frankel says.

More than 20,000 people a year visit OOF. “Over 95 per cent of people coming here have never been to a contemporary art exhibition,” Frankel says. “There are four schools around the stadium, so what is the chance of them getting taken to the Tate or National Gallery? Never.”

The present exhibition is by the French artist Leyman Lahcine, of footballers as “angst-ridden string puppets”. As the captions explain: “Instead of taking the ball down on your chest and accelerating towards goal, your body collapses into a tangle of soft, lifeless limbs. The groan from the crowd is deafening . . . This is how it always ends.”

Fortunately not for Spurs at the moment. They’re flying. Back in the stadium I find the chicken house, and talk to one of the staff, Aaron Plummer, who has cerebral palsy. “When I went for jobs before, they saw my learning disability before they saw me,” Plummer says. “I was looking for a job for over a year. I didn’t know where to go. Then Tottenham gave me a chance.

“I clean tables, making it spotless. It’s changed my life: to say I work at somewhere like Tottenham with 50,000 fans!” The regeneration game continues apace at Spurs.
Reading the last two paragraphs is pretty emotional. Thanks.
 

he focus is inevitably on achieving good results at Tottenham Hotspur, but not simply on the field. As part of the regeneration of the area around their new stadium, Spurs built (and now run) a school that has done so well that ten pupils at present have Oxbridge offers and await next week’s A-level results day hopefully.

Spurs fans thronging into their gleaming home may not realise that there is a school attached, as well as an art gallery that recently exhibited portraits of heartbroken England men’s players at the European Championship. They may not notice the artificial pitch made of 18,000 recycled trainers and small-sided pitches where club coaches work on talent ID at nearby schools. They may not know about the club’s employment policy that has given hope, purpose and funds to local youngsters with cerebral palsy.


Premier League clubs get things wrong at times, they can overcharge fans for kits and tickets, but they remain vital hubs of the community. The Tottenham Hotspur Stadium is more than an arena that wins architectural awards and houses a confident Champions League team. It’s a beacon of hope and belief in an area that is among the most deprived wards in the country.
It’s only a decade since the streets here were set ablaze during riots, and visiting fans subsequently chanted: “You stupid bastards, you burnt your own town.” Some local youths were more likely to join gangs than coaching sessions. Now, outside of match days, they flock to the stadium to be coached and educated.
One of the pupils at the London Academy of Excellence Tottenham (LAET) is Rachel Oloyede-Oyeyemi, who has an offer to read English literature at Cambridge. “I live near where Mark Duggan got shot,” she says of the killing of a 29-year-old black man by police on August 4, 2011, that triggered the riots. “Everyone was on edge there. It was scary. I didn’t want to go outside. It was like Tottenham’s burning down.”

Now it is rebuilding. “I don’t think I’d be doing English lit or thinking about Cambridge without this school,” she adds. “The teaching gave me the fire I needed. They cultivated my love for English. They really show you how much you can achieve if you genuinely put your mind to it.”

LAET is a state-funded sixth form assisted by Spurs and Highgate School, who also help with interview technique to prepare pupils for Oxbridge. “It feels that Tottenham’s proud again, people coming to this beautiful stadium for football but also education,” she says. “The stadium’s a symbol of hope.”

Another pupil, Giovanni Rose, was eight during the riots. “On my road, Park Lane [adjacent to the old and new stadium], there was a gang and it was a very violent time,” Rose says, also recalling what befell the famous Carpetright store on Tottenham High Road. “One of my friends had his house set on fire, it was crazy. I’m grateful to the club, 100 per cent, as it’s kept a lot of us safe.”

Since coming under the guidance of Spurs, Rose has had some of his poetry published by the BBC, studied maths, further maths and physics at LAET and received an offer from King’s College London. “I wouldn’t even be doing A-levels without this place,” he says, looking around LAET.

The Times is given a tour, including to where two games are taking place in the N17 arena behind the South Stand. The Tottenham Foundation has worked hard with local children coming out of lockdown, using the new pitches for games and rebuilding relationships. “They’ve missed out on social interaction,” one staff member confides. “They’re always happy to come down here to sessions. It’s about safe spaces.”

Yards away, on a smaller-sided pitch, two academy coaches, Danny Mitchell and Nick Hardy, are working with under-tens, looking for potential talent for Spurs. “The badge is very important,” Mitchell says. “We want to tap into their passion for the team.” They also find that players open up to coaches over issues in their lives. It’s about developing the player and the individual. “It’s a holistic piece,” Mitchell adds.

Throughout August, Spurs deliver a programme of free holiday activity, from football to the performing arts, for young people at the N17 arena. The aim is to promote “health and wellbeing and reduce levels of crime and antisocial behaviour” but there is also more talent ID work.

Continuing around the ground, along Tottenham High Road we find the grade II listed Warmington House incorporated in the structure of the stadium. Restored to its original 1828 glory and removed from Historic England’s at-risk register, the building houses OOF, an art gallery. “OOF is the sound of someone getting tackled very hard,” explains Eddy Frankel, the inspiration behind the gallery and a Spurs fan.

Frankel was seeking exhibition space in the area and contacted the club. “Spurs went, ‘Well, we’ve got this listed building.’ ” Frankel’s first exhibition had works from the Young British Artists school, including a Sarah Lucas and a Marcus Harvey lent by Damien Hirst. As Harvey’s works are also on display at MoMA in New York, OOF has done well. “To have them here was amazing,” Frankel says. Eric Dier was one of the first to visit.

More recently Frankel curated an exhibition, En-Ger-Land. This included Beatrice Lettice Boyle’s portraits of a haunted Bukayo Saka, Jack Grealish and Jadon Sancho, entitled Tears in Their Eyes, after their loss to Italy in last year’s Euros final. “It’s about the repercussions [of defeat],” Frankel says.

During En-Ger-Land, visitors were encouraged to draw versions of England trauma. “I had to edit them every morning to remove all the penises and take away anything offensive to our rivals!” Frankel says.

More than 20,000 people a year visit OOF. “Over 95 per cent of people coming here have never been to a contemporary art exhibition,” Frankel says. “There are four schools around the stadium, so what is the chance of them getting taken to the Tate or National Gallery? Never.”

The present exhibition is by the French artist Leyman Lahcine, of footballers as “angst-ridden string puppets”. As the captions explain: “Instead of taking the ball down on your chest and accelerating towards goal, your body collapses into a tangle of soft, lifeless limbs. The groan from the crowd is deafening . . . This is how it always ends.”

Fortunately not for Spurs at the moment. They’re flying. Back in the stadium I find the chicken house, and talk to one of the staff, Aaron Plummer, who has cerebral palsy. “When I went for jobs before, they saw my learning disability before they saw me,” Plummer says. “I was looking for a job for over a year. I didn’t know where to go. Then Tottenham gave me a chance.

“I clean tables, making it spotless. It’s changed my life: to say I work at somewhere like Tottenham with 50,000 fans!” The regeneration game continues apace at Spurs.
Fucking Levy. Spending money on good causes instead of winning cups.
 

he focus is inevitably on achieving good results at Tottenham Hotspur, but not simply on the field. As part of the regeneration of the area around their new stadium, Spurs built (and now run) a school that has done so well that ten pupils at present have Oxbridge offers and await next week’s A-level results day hopefully.

Spurs fans thronging into their gleaming home may not realise that there is a school attached, as well as an art gallery that recently exhibited portraits of heartbroken England men’s players at the European Championship. They may not notice the artificial pitch made of 18,000 recycled trainers and small-sided pitches where club coaches work on talent ID at nearby schools. They may not know about the club’s employment policy that has given hope, purpose and funds to local youngsters with cerebral palsy.


Premier League clubs get things wrong at times, they can overcharge fans for kits and tickets, but they remain vital hubs of the community. The Tottenham Hotspur Stadium is more than an arena that wins architectural awards and houses a confident Champions League team. It’s a beacon of hope and belief in an area that is among the most deprived wards in the country.
It’s only a decade since the streets here were set ablaze during riots, and visiting fans subsequently chanted: “You stupid bastards, you burnt your own town.” Some local youths were more likely to join gangs than coaching sessions. Now, outside of match days, they flock to the stadium to be coached and educated.
One of the pupils at the London Academy of Excellence Tottenham (LAET) is Rachel Oloyede-Oyeyemi, who has an offer to read English literature at Cambridge. “I live near where Mark Duggan got shot,” she says of the killing of a 29-year-old black man by police on August 4, 2011, that triggered the riots. “Everyone was on edge there. It was scary. I didn’t want to go outside. It was like Tottenham’s burning down.”

Now it is rebuilding. “I don’t think I’d be doing English lit or thinking about Cambridge without this school,” she adds. “The teaching gave me the fire I needed. They cultivated my love for English. They really show you how much you can achieve if you genuinely put your mind to it.”

LAET is a state-funded sixth form assisted by Spurs and Highgate School, who also help with interview technique to prepare pupils for Oxbridge. “It feels that Tottenham’s proud again, people coming to this beautiful stadium for football but also education,” she says. “The stadium’s a symbol of hope.”

Another pupil, Giovanni Rose, was eight during the riots. “On my road, Park Lane [adjacent to the old and new stadium], there was a gang and it was a very violent time,” Rose says, also recalling what befell the famous Carpetright store on Tottenham High Road. “One of my friends had his house set on fire, it was crazy. I’m grateful to the club, 100 per cent, as it’s kept a lot of us safe.”

Since coming under the guidance of Spurs, Rose has had some of his poetry published by the BBC, studied maths, further maths and physics at LAET and received an offer from King’s College London. “I wouldn’t even be doing A-levels without this place,” he says, looking around LAET.

The Times is given a tour, including to where two games are taking place in the N17 arena behind the South Stand. The Tottenham Foundation has worked hard with local children coming out of lockdown, using the new pitches for games and rebuilding relationships. “They’ve missed out on social interaction,” one staff member confides. “They’re always happy to come down here to sessions. It’s about safe spaces.”

Yards away, on a smaller-sided pitch, two academy coaches, Danny Mitchell and Nick Hardy, are working with under-tens, looking for potential talent for Spurs. “The badge is very important,” Mitchell says. “We want to tap into their passion for the team.” They also find that players open up to coaches over issues in their lives. It’s about developing the player and the individual. “It’s a holistic piece,” Mitchell adds.

Throughout August, Spurs deliver a programme of free holiday activity, from football to the performing arts, for young people at the N17 arena. The aim is to promote “health and wellbeing and reduce levels of crime and antisocial behaviour” but there is also more talent ID work.

Continuing around the ground, along Tottenham High Road we find the grade II listed Warmington House incorporated in the structure of the stadium. Restored to its original 1828 glory and removed from Historic England’s at-risk register, the building houses OOF, an art gallery. “OOF is the sound of someone getting tackled very hard,” explains Eddy Frankel, the inspiration behind the gallery and a Spurs fan.

Frankel was seeking exhibition space in the area and contacted the club. “Spurs went, ‘Well, we’ve got this listed building.’ ” Frankel’s first exhibition had works from the Young British Artists school, including a Sarah Lucas and a Marcus Harvey lent by Damien Hirst. As Harvey’s works are also on display at MoMA in New York, OOF has done well. “To have them here was amazing,” Frankel says. Eric Dier was one of the first to visit.

More recently Frankel curated an exhibition, En-Ger-Land. This included Beatrice Lettice Boyle’s portraits of a haunted Bukayo Saka, Jack Grealish and Jadon Sancho, entitled Tears in Their Eyes, after their loss to Italy in last year’s Euros final. “It’s about the repercussions [of defeat],” Frankel says.

During En-Ger-Land, visitors were encouraged to draw versions of England trauma. “I had to edit them every morning to remove all the penises and take away anything offensive to our rivals!” Frankel says.

More than 20,000 people a year visit OOF. “Over 95 per cent of people coming here have never been to a contemporary art exhibition,” Frankel says. “There are four schools around the stadium, so what is the chance of them getting taken to the Tate or National Gallery? Never.”

The present exhibition is by the French artist Leyman Lahcine, of footballers as “angst-ridden string puppets”. As the captions explain: “Instead of taking the ball down on your chest and accelerating towards goal, your body collapses into a tangle of soft, lifeless limbs. The groan from the crowd is deafening . . . This is how it always ends.”

Fortunately not for Spurs at the moment. They’re flying. Back in the stadium I find the chicken house, and talk to one of the staff, Aaron Plummer, who has cerebral palsy. “When I went for jobs before, they saw my learning disability before they saw me,” Plummer says. “I was looking for a job for over a year. I didn’t know where to go. Then Tottenham gave me a chance.

“I clean tables, making it spotless. It’s changed my life: to say I work at somewhere like Tottenham with 50,000 fans!” The regeneration game continues apace at Spurs.
OnLy IntEresTeD in pRofiTs.
 
Compare to last year..


Last year was Nuno. I'm surprised there was even 25% of people who weren't furious with ENIC and where the club where. I can't even believe ENIC were happy with themselves.

The latest one is still fairly indicative of the football fans view. The small section shows 75% of fans think the business side is sorted but the football side isnt.
Only 12% think they do a good job. That's probably just airfix, stevee and shadydan taking the survey multiple times.
 
Last year was Nuno. I'm surprised there was even 25% of people who weren't furious with ENIC and where the club where. I can't even believe ENIC were happy with themselves.

The latest one is still fairly indicative of the football fans view. The small section shows 75% of fans think the business side is sorted but the football side isnt.
Only 12% think they do a good job. That's probably just airfix, stevee and shadydan taking the survey multiple times.
And only 3% think that Enic should sell up now.
So that's you, Moan Thomas and Scott covered then.

:adethumbup:
 
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