In search of Nuno's successor.

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Who do you want?

  • Graham Potter

    Votes: 39 30.2%
  • Scott Parker

    Votes: 4 3.1%
  • Mauricio Pochettino

    Votes: 11 8.5%
  • Erik Ten Hag

    Votes: 16 12.4%
  • Paulo Fonseca

    Votes: 1 0.8%
  • Marcelo Gallardo

    Votes: 11 8.5%
  • Gian Piero Gasperini

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Antonio Conte

    Votes: 39 30.2%
  • Steven Gerrard

    Votes: 4 3.1%
  • Lucien Favre

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Ernesto Valverde

    Votes: 3 2.3%
  • Ralph Hasenhüttl

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Bo Svensson

    Votes: 1 0.8%
  • Sérgio Conceição

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Niko Kovač

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    129
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The thumbs ratio is disturbing again...
Welcome to the age of virtue signalling where almost everything gets politicised
 

Barmby

Hereski
Would you have the same thoughts if Conte became our new manager? Fingers crossed the bald cunt can get him signed on the dotted line by tonight!
Yes, to be honest that was my thought. A Kane reluctant to play or put the effort in, sell him and give Conte money to invest in January. I don't want him to leave but pragmatism may win out here.
 
This is a very revealing article on why Nuno appt went wrong:


Here are some excerpts:

His lack of communication:
Silva was Nuno’s No 2 at Wolves for four years and was one of his most vocal links with the dressing room. So with Silva pulling out of Nuno’s team at the last minute, the new head coach was left diminished by his absence. Especially when it came to one of his biggest failings: communication.

Anyone who has been to a Nuno press conference, or even watched an interview with him, knows how he communicates. He is unquestionably a thoughtful and intelligent man, and he chooses his words very carefully. But there is something minimalistic about how he talks, as if he tries to answer every question in as few words as possible. Virtual rather than in-person press conferences only seemed to exacerbate this.

It is not just a front or a defence mechanism put on for the media either. This is how Nuno speaks to the players as well. There is no small-talk, no chit-chat, no real dialogue with them away from the training pitch. And with no Silva there as his assistant, no one to fill that gap. What you see in Nuno’s press conferences is what you get around Hotspur Way, his new colleagues observed.

Even people who had seen Nuno up close at both Wolves and Spurs noticed he was a very different man, quieter and more withdrawn. Maybe it was the clear backing of the Molineux board, or the presence of Silva, but Nuno would speak to the players more in the West Midlands, bringing people together and forging a clear team spirit. He had the confidence of a manager who was enjoying his work and felt secure in his position.

There was none of that at Spurs. This was a much bigger squad, with higher-profile players, and that made trying to build a sense of unity and shared purpose so much harder for him. There was also little sense that Nuno was putting down roots at the London club and building relationships, perhaps another consequence of that two-year contract.

In a Tottenham dressing room with some dominant personalities, Nuno was seen as a quiet voice. Players and staff would often talk of him being “distant”, “uncommunicative” and having, compared to his predecessors, “zero charisma”. That said, they respected his decency and work ethic.

In the honeymoon stage of Nuno’s tenure, his austerity with words was taken as a potential positive. He would not come into the job making bold promises to the players about how important they were to him, or how much they would feature this season. Nuno refused to make any such promises to anyone. He did not even engage with the players who were close to leaving or trying to leave the club — precisely the sort of players who might have benefited from a conversation like that. Some players were left waiting for a phone call or a chat that never came.

Nuno’s lack of dialogue might make life less comfortable for the Tottenham squad, the optimistic theory went, but maybe that was no bad thing. Perhaps the players not knowing where they stood in the club hierarchy would keep them on their toes, would stop them from getting complacent and would force them to prove their value to him. Maybe Nuno’s ruthlessness would turn into a strength. This had been the case at Wolves, where he had more authority and his few words carried more weight. Unfortunately, it did not turn out this way at Spurs.

When Nuno arrived at Hotspur Way he was allocated a smaller manager’s office, with the large office that used to belong to Pochettino and Mourinho now being occupied by Paratici. Nuno and his staff would hole up around the table at the coaches’ office, which adjoined Nuno’s own room, rather than being out in the open-plan office area. To players who remembered the glory days of Pochettino, when he would make time for everyone, it felt like a closed shop.

This was especially pertinent because everyone at the club — not just playing staff — needed a lift after two bruising years. They needed a figure like Pochettino in his early years who would make them feel like they were part of something bigger and raise morale. Nuno was never going to be that man and as it turned out, none of his coaches was either. There was never any sense of camaraderie, which was badly needed after the dark mood that engulfed the club towards the end of Mourinho’s time in charge.

Interesting anecdote about Mourinho:

Nuno was never as unpopular as Mourinho was with the squad, in part because he would not criticise the players as fiercely in public or private as Mourinho willingly did. Just before Mourinho’s last game, the 2-2 draw with Everton in April, the Spurs squad took a vote among themselves about whether they wanted him in charge still or not and only two players voted in favour. Nuno never faced the same dressing room revolt.

Style of play:

This is a Tottenham squad that was crying out for clear footballing direction on the training ground and positive man-management. The players were frustrated that Nuno did not deliver either. An approach to the game did become apparent over time — a well-organised and structured 4-3-3 (that became a 4-2-3-1 in the last few games), with a focus on team shape and pressing at the right time. Over the last few games, they did get more comfortable in possession. But they were never good at creating chances and never looked like they had a plan to do so. “It’s unclear how we’re playing”, said one dressing-room source after the Woolwich defeat. “There are no patterns of play.”
 

Tomo

Supporter
This is a very revealing article on why Nuno appt went wrong:


Here are some excerpts:

His lack of communication:


Interesting anecdote about Mourinho:



Style of play:


‘’But they were never good at creating chances and never looked like they had a plan to do so. “It’s unclear how we’re playing”, said one dressing-room source after the Woolwich defeat. “There are no patterns of play.”

The most obvious issue with Nuno’s reign right there.
 
This is a very revealing article on why Nuno appt went wrong:


Here are some excerpts:

His lack of communication:


Interesting anecdote about Mourinho:



Style of play:
Why the fuck are the players getting a vote? The English players can barely tie their own shoes.
 
This is a very revealing article on why Nuno appt went wrong:


Here are some excerpts:

His lack of communication:


Interesting anecdote about Mourinho:



Style of play:
Interesting stuff.

Our players don’t half seem to be a bunch of dickheads.
 
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